Wednesday, January 5, 2011

jobs for linguists

As the economy slowly starts to wake, I hope and expect to see more jobs like this one popping up where general linguistics skills are being sought by innovative tech companies (these were a dime a dozen in the glory days of the tech boom 90s). Were I a bit younger, and less well-payed, I'd probably consider applying myself.

We are seeking a Linguist interested in joining a rapidly growing organization. The Linguist will work closely with our NLP Team in researching and developing lexica and grammars specific to various languages (“Language Packs”) that will be used for various NLP tasks. She/he will be expected to
contribute substantive insight/action with regard to developing language packs and must have a keen eye for understanding the end-user experience.


Specific responsibilities include:
- Research specific languages for their lexical, morphological, and
grammatical structures
- Develop original lexicons and reformat acquired lexicons
- Create grammatical rules using the research done above or other sources
- Analyze results from the system for mistakes and plan for improvement
- Willingness to focus research and development of Language Packs on
meeting the end-user’s needs

If you're a linguist interested in a non-academic career, you could do worse than apply here.

And for the record, I have no association with this company, have never worked for them, get nothing from posting this, but I do know one of their employees (we went to grad school together).

3 comments:

paradog said...

While it's good to see new opportunities for linguists, I'd be interested in finding out how the people getting these jobs fared. The companies generally seem to expect too much and their products promise too much considering the state of the art. And when a Google engineer claims in the SF Chronicle that machines understand English at about the level of a human 10-year-old, one can only shake ones head sadly.

- Ernie in Berkeley
For a good summary of the problem, my late colleage (we worked at an NLP startup), read this PDF:

http://www.ami-k.com.wstub.archive.org/Papers/WhyYouStillCant.pdf

Chris said...

Sadly, the 90s saw a lot of people layed off who were not core engineers.

Clarabridge has been around for awhile, but they're still VC funded, meaning not profitable yet, and that's the key to longevity.

FYI, the pdf link seems to be broken, could you double check?

paradog said...

Hmm, I guess you have to get it from the page it's linked from at archive.org . The author's web page isn't maintained anymore.

http://web.archive.org/web/20031219135546/www.ami-k.com/WhyYouStill.htm

Link at the bottom.

- Ernie in Berkeley

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